Tag Archives: Immune Checkpoint

Nobel Prize 2018: The Victory March of Immunotherapy

Autumn has arrived. Time to walk along streets lined with colorful leaves, collect chestnuts (yes, plural, because one can never have too many chestnuts in his or her coat pockets), drink a warm cup of tea, and make oneself comfortable on the sofa. Well, and to decide who will be this year’s Nobel Prize winners! On Monday, October 1st 2018, the Royal Swedish Academy of … Continue reading Nobel Prize 2018: The Victory March of Immunotherapy »

Fighting Melanoma – Quantum Leap Ahead

“We can begin to dare dreaming about curing melanoma”, a sentence I’ve heard said out loud on the podium during last year’s Society of Melanoma Research (SMR) conference in Boston, the largest and most important conference for all those involved in the fight against malignant melanoma. This sentence would not have been thinkable only a few years ago. Back then, classical chemotherapy using the DNA … Continue reading Fighting Melanoma – Quantum Leap Ahead »

Immune Checkpoint Blockade: A milestone on the way to cure cancer

For a scientist, one of the most exciting things to happen is when basic principles established in laboratory models lead to new therapeutic approaches for humans. Most recently, the understanding of several checkpoints in T cell self-tolerance, infection and transplantation led to the development of immune checkpoint blockade to treat cancer. The use of drugs blocking specific checkpoints, such as Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) and … Continue reading Immune Checkpoint Blockade: A milestone on the way to cure cancer »